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How to Check Combustion Chamber Volume in Cylinder Heads

Uncategorized June 23, 2017

The do-it-yourself engine builder is always looking to get the most out of every build.  But without verifying the combustion chamber volume on the cylinder heads, it’s impossible to be sure of the engine’s true compression.  Luckily, with the help of a few special tools, the process of CC’ing cylinder heads can be done in a relatively easy fashion.

In this video from horsepowermonster.com Jeff Huneycutt lays out the steps to verify combustion chamber volume and the tools needed to complete the process.

The post How to Check Combustion Chamber Volume in Cylinder Heads appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

Source: Hot Rod

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A Big Block C10- it’s better than crack!

Uncategorized June 23, 2017

Arriving to work late in the day after a recent photo shoot, a co-worker asked why I looked so happy. Without hesitation, I blurted out, “I love driving the C10!” And why not! I had just driven in from Huntington Beach via Pacific Coast Highway in Truck Norris, Car Craft’s big-block, six-speed 1967 C10 project car. Coastal route or not, driving the C10 makes me feel pretty awesome, and that’s a rare feeling.

Prior to the C10, my only experience driving something with a big-block has all been stock 454s in 1-ton pickups, so admittedly, my perspective may be skewed a little low. Still, I’ve driven some fast cars in my years with the magazines, but by comparison, the 700hp BluePrint Engines 540 in the C10 is otherworldly. It’s raucous, loud, and fast. It wasn’t designed to meet NVH standards or be compliant to pass-by noise tests. I like that I can hear the valvetrain running and that it shakes the truck at idle, Yet, the engine is totally driveable in bumper-to-bumper traffic, thanks in part to AEM’s Infinity fuel injection, which has performed flawlessly and is responsible for a better-than-expected 12-mpg average in mixed driving. The T56 Magnum transmission heightens the experience exponentially, like upping the saturation of an already vivid picture, and I get tremendous satisfaction running up and down the gears listening to the sound of the engine coming through the firewall and blasting out the tailpipes.

Just a few days ago, I gave a friend a ride home in the C10, and he remarked out of the blue that the thing felt like a motorcycle. This caught me by surprise, because I had been turning the notion over in my head as well. The motorcycle analogy is a sort of benchmark for me because I had one of those rare instances in life where you feel utterly full of joy and happiness, and it happened on a motorcycle. It’s weird, too: In my case, I wasn’t doing anything heroic like dragging a knee through a corner. I was on a Honda Shadow doing my best to keep it between the lines of a twisty road in rural Ohio somewhere south of Cleveland. For whatever reason, everything in life felt perfect—there wasn’t a single thing I would have changed at the time. The experience was so strong that I remember it in vivid detail even today.

Of course, the C10 is not light and nimble like a motorcycle, but what it does have is that feeling of purity you experience on one. The C10 has manual brakes, manual steering, and a direct-mounted shifter. There is no sound-deadening material, no carpet, and no air conditioning. You’re basically sitting on a big engine and transmission, with no buffer between you and the road. Plus, with a weight-to-power ratio of about 6.8 pounds per horsepower, it definitely accelerates like most of the (admittedly few) motorcycles I’ve ridden. It’s a raw, visceral, and physical experience driving the thing, and I think that’s why I love it so much.

Does that mean I’m going to take all the power assist off of my other cars? No, but it illustrates why we do these things. Some people get pleasure from the hunt for the car. Others get satisfaction in the build process, personalizing a car to suit your taste and style. I like those, too, but I really love to drive. It’s easy for me to lose myself in the experience of driving and feel very happy doing so. No one needs a big-block, six-speed anything these days, but in the few short months the C10 has been running reliably after the driveline swap, it’s made me feel better than any round of Zoloft or Lexapro I’ve ever taken. And you don’t have to ask your doctor if a big-block is right for you! It just is, and we all know it.

The post A Big Block C10- it’s better than crack! appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

Source: Hot Rod

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Alfa Romeo won't use incentives as brand puts panache over sales

Uncategorized June 23, 2017

Alfa Romeo’s global brand chief says he won’t cut prices to meet lofty U.S. sales goals, because he insists FCA isn’t setting such targets.
Source: Automotive News – swapmeetclassified

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Mitsubishi eyes Renault-Nissan resources to grow in U.S., China

Uncategorized June 23, 2017

Mitsubishi wants to tap the Renault-Nissan “toolbox” to unlock sales growth in the world’s two biggest auto markets: the U.S. and China.
Source: Automotive News – swapmeetclassified

2 total views, 1 today

GALLERY: Dirt Kings Invade Shawano and 141 Speedway

Uncategorized June 23, 2017

The Dirt Kings Late Model Tour has been off to a busy start with four races in its first month of existence.  This past week the newly formed series made two stops – one at Shawano (WI) Speedway on Saturday night and a second on Tuesday at 141 Speedway in Francis Creek, WI.

The story line for both events had the same ending with current point leader Nick Anvelink finding Victory Lane.  However, the plot to get there was much different at 141 than it was at Shawano.

At his home track Anvelink cruised to the win from the pole position.  His biggest threat came late in the race when Brett Swedberg made up some ground in lapped traffic and approached Anvelink on the final circuit of the 25-lap affair.

On Tuesday at 141 the roles were reversed as Anvelink challenged Swedberg late in the going.  It looked as though Swedberg was set up to cruise to a the win as he mastered the high groove. Anvelink looked to be a non-factor as he dropped out of the Top Five early in the race.  A final restart allowed Anvelink to steal Second from Mike Mullen and eventually complete the pass on Swedberg for the win as the low groove came to life.

For more information visit www.dirtkingstour.com



















































































































































































































































































The post GALLERY: Dirt Kings Invade Shawano and 141 Speedway appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

Source: Hot Rod

1 total views, 1 today

The Buick Riviera, Part I: Larry Olson’s 1965 GS

Uncategorized June 23, 2017

Cadillac’s loss was definitely Buick’s gain, as the first-generation 1963-1965 Buick Riviera (the official badge-wearer) will without a doubt go down in history as one of General Motors’ sexiest models of the 20th century. Out the gate it’s a factory custom with its sharp yet sleek and flowing lines—and its shorter, narrower platform and available 360hp dual-quad V-8 took granny to the grocery store a quarter-mile down the block in 8 seconds or less. Beauty and brawn all wrapped up in one.

And because Buick did such as fine job “interpreting” creator Bill Mitchell’s original design, there’s really not a whole lot you need to do other than drop ’em and drive ’em. (It would be interesting to see how well the Riviera would’ve sold had his personalized Silver Arrow version—the stock 1963 coupe chopped/stylized by Creative Industries—been the production model.) Unlike its Impala and Chevelle brethren of the era, however, there are marketplace limitations when it comes to bolt-on options related to drivetrain and suspension simply based on the uniqueness of chassis and engine design … but there are no limitations for creativity, something Bobby Alloway has plenty of when it comes constructing the most radically subtle hot rods on the planet.

If you’re familiar with Alloway’s Hot Rod Shop then that multiple-negation description should make total sense—Bobby Alloway has the keen ability and honed skill to dramatically transform a vehicle yet retain the vital design aspects that made it iconic to begin with. It’s not just lowering and choosing the right wheels and tires; it’s lowering in a manner that accommodates his signature bigs ’n’ littles physically and aesthetically, which directly correlates to the drivetrain doing the same. Larry Olson’s Riviera is the perfect case study in the Alloway method of radical subtlety.

Olson is no stranger to the Alloway way—he’s got three prior done by Alloway, the most recent being a 1951 Chevy Fleetline. Number four, the 1965 GS, was actually pitched to him by Alloway, who’d picked the car up from a local fellow selling it due to his wife leaving him because of it (hoping the sale would help get her back). Despite Larry’s wife saying she’d leave him too if he bought it, he bought it—it’s one of his favorite cars, he couldn’t say no—and the nearly yearlong build began (and with the only stipulation being that the Riviera be done the traditional Alloway way: healthy big-block with a five-speed, bigs ’n’ littles, and, of course, black inside and out).

Alloway’s went about transforming the Buick in their customary manner, first addressing the chassis to achieve the stance. In this case, those aforementioned limitations were altogether alleviated by ditching everything from the firewall forward, including the framerails, and incorporating an Art Morrison Bikini Clip. Complete with Strange coilovers, 14-inch Wilwood discs, DSE power rack-and-pinion, and of course Art Morrison’s proprietary IFS, it afforded all the benefits of modern handling—and allowed Alloway’s to set it precisely where they wanted to achieve the desired ride height and accommodate the Chevrolet Performance 502 and TREMEC five-speed at the same time. For the rear, the stock trailing arms were swapped out for a G-body factory coilover conversion kit from Currie, which locates one of their custom 9 inches outfitted with 14-inch Wilwoods as well. (Notice, if you will, it’s not your average 9-inch housing—much work went into the molding and smoothing of the entire rear undercarriage, especially the housing.) And while the stock steering column was retained and adapted to the DSE rack, the original pedal assembly was swapped out for a clutch-optioned setup from Kugel Komponents to facilitate the new American Powertrain gearbox. Furthermore, even with the front suspension tucked up nice and high (the upper control arms nearly level with the custom Nailhead-inspired valve covers), which necessitated the stock framerails leading up to the splice joint be pie-cut and tapered for ground clearance, Barrilaro Speed Emporium still managed to squeeze a full-length 2-1/2-inch Borla stainless exhaust that feeds off their own custom-built headers. All this—and more—resulting in the 19- and 22-inch Billet Specialties “Alloway 5” wheels with 35- and 45-series BFGoodrich g-Force radials articulating within their respective fenderwells perfectly … without airbags.

The exterior, well, it’s exactly what you’d expect from an Alloway build: flawless, absolutely flawless. Beneath the ocean-deep PPG Deltron 9700 black, external features such as the wipers and cowl panel, lower rear window vents, and stainless lower side trim were removed and smoothed; bumper-to-body gaps relieved accordingly; and the rear wheel openings stretched to accommodate the larger rolling stock. And the interior lives up to the same standards, no less, with amazing leather work by Steve Holcomb/Pro Auto Upholstery covering everything from the foreign frontal seating (1964 T-Bird) and custom-made-to-match rear buckets—all divided by an elongated center console—to the 1959 Impala armrest–equipped door panels. Factory gauges have been updated in proper fashion courtesy of Classic Instruments, while the old Harrison A/C unit was updated with a Vintage Air system.

In the end, while the original seller’s wife never returned, as of the Riviera’s completion, we’re happy to report that Larry is still happily married—oh, and he’s finally got a 1965 GS in his stable … an Alloway’d GS, that is.

The post The Buick Riviera, Part I: Larry Olson’s 1965 GS appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

Source: Hot Rod

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FCA tries to dodge Demon responsibility

Uncategorized June 22, 2017

Customers must agree Demon “shall not move” when it’s cold, shouldn’t drive when it rains or on the highway and won’t use full functions off the track.
Source: Automotive News – swapmeetclassified

2 total views, 0 today

Tesla exploring China car plant with Shanghai government

Uncategorized June 22, 2017

Tesla said it is exploring the possibility of establishing a Chinese manufacturing plant with the Shanghai municipal government.
Source: Automotive News – swapmeetclassified

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Trading Speed for Altitude – Big Red’s Prep for Pikes Peak

Uncategorized June 22, 2017

How Big Red Camaro resets for America’s biggest hill climb.

You can’t build one car to race everything as-is. The rule of compromise says that if you want to be strong in one area of performance, there’s always a trade off in another. This is why when Big Red was able to rethink and rebuild the package over the last two years, a multi-configuration chassis was in the cards to allow the Baddest Camaro Ever to succeed in land speed and road race-style events. Here’s the process of converting Big Red from its fastest form ever (besting its old top-speed record with a 253.7mph run at Mojave) to its tallest challenge yet: The 2017 Pikes Peak Hill Climb, 14,115 feet of cloud-punching madness.

The post Trading Speed for Altitude – Big Red’s Prep for Pikes Peak appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

Source: Hot Rod

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Tire Siping Made EZ

Uncategorized June 21, 2017

When it comes to tires, it’s all about maximizing the traction.  Many dirt racers either grind or sipe (or both) their tires to find the extra grip.  Those racers will tell you just how intense and time consuming that process can be.

With that in mind, 5 Point Fabrication has introduced the EZ Sipe.  The machine is able to complete the siping process in just eight minutes.  When the process is done by hand, it can take over an hour.

Be aware…the machine is quite an investment.  However, nearly all of the EZ Sipes that have been manufactured have been sold throughout the county since the machine’s introduction just a few months ago.

Former IMCA Modified racer and EZ Sipe representative Dan Ratajczyk explained the machine to us in this video.

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For more information visit www.5pointfab.com

The post Tire Siping Made EZ appeared first on Hot Rod Network.

Source: Hot Rod

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